Tremblant-Prévost

Québec

Tremblant–Prévost is home to one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world – the Laurentian Mountains, which are made of rocks dating back more than 540 million years. Despite being worn down by multiple glaciations and the elements ages ago, they remain a majestic wonder, and a historic presence across the stunning Québec landscape. Its sheer beauty attracts local residents and visitors from afar, giving them an escape from the city – a hideaway from home.

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Land

It’s important for people to have places where they can get in touch with nature. Many of our properties are open to the public, giving visitors a chance to develop their own interests in the outdoors.”
- Rob Gardner (Conservation Coordinator)
map of the Tremblant-Prévost region

Tremblant-Prévost, Québec

45° 53’ 50" N

74° 5’ 27" W

The Region

From hiking in the summer to snowshoeing in the winter, the Tremblant-Prévost region, sometimes referred to as 'little Switzerland', offers a natural playground for outdoor enthusiasts. While urban dwellers are encouraged to explore this mountainous and forested countryside, designated trails have been laid out to help safeguard it. With endangered species roaming about, it’s imperative that this region and others like it are well monitored, while still allowing people to enjoy these natural wonders.

2,200
Acres Forever Protected

Water & Forest

Fresh water ecosystems (rivers, lakes, wetlands), and forest ecosystems (temperate broadleaf and mixed forests) make up most of Tremblant–Prévost region.

-19°C / 24°C

The temperature plummets to -19°C in January, reaching highs of 24°C in July.

1,154 mm

The annual precipitation is 1,154 mm (854 mm of rain, and 3 metres of snow).

968 m

The Tremblant–Prévost region is blanketed with hills, depressions, and plateaus. Its highest peak is 968 metres.

Life

We have staff in the fields, boots in the mud, taking care of these properties and the life that resides here.”
- Colin Anderson (Manager, Conservation Information)

Wildlife

The Tremblant–Prévost region has an undeniable wealth of wildlife. This massive stretch of land, and the various habitats throughout, provide a home for animals of all types, shapes, and sizes.

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

  • The peregrine falcon is the largest falcon over most of the continent and the fastest member in the animal kingdom. In fact, the highest speed a peregrine falcon was ever clocked at was 389 km/h. That’s the speed of four cheetahs combined.

  • 36-49 cm The peregrine falcon’s body length measures 36 to 49 centimetres, with a wingspan that can reach 110 centimetres. Females are 30% larger than their male counterparts.

  • While its diet is made up mostly of other birds, the peregrine falcon will occasionally snack on small mammals, reptiles, or even insects.

  • The peregrine falcon generally nests on the ledges of steep cliffs.

  • This extremely fast bird of prey has been used in falconry for the better part of 3,000 years, beginning with nomads in central Asia.

  • Pesticides are life threatening to many species, and the peregrine falcon is not immune to this. In times past, its population was severely lowered because of DDT (a harmful pesticide), however, since its ban in 1970, the peregrine falcon population has been on the rise in Québec and North America.

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Smooth Green Snake

Smooth Green Snake

  • The smooth green snake is a lover, not a fighter. Well, more or less. This non-aggressive snake rarely bites, and usually slithers away if threatened. However, if provoked, they will secrete a foul smell to steer away hungry mouths.

  • 36–51cm This species of snake measures 36–51 centimetres in adulthood.

  • Spiders, moths, ants, snails, worms, and slugs would be the ideal buffet for the smooth green snake.

  • Wet shrubby habitats like fields, fallows, woodland borders, peat lands, and frequently disturbed habitats like electric distribution lines and pastures. It’s found in marshes, meadows, open woods, and along stream edges.

  • Destruction of wetlands and peat lands are threatening local populations of the smooth green snake.

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Pickerel Frog

Pickerel Frog

  • The frog other frogs wouldn’t want to mess with. Often confused with its cousin, the leopard frog, the pickerel frog is much more deadly secreting a toxin when stressed or aggravated, which is toxic to many of his predators.

  • 4.4–7.9 cm Adult males sizes range between 4.4–7.9 centimetres.

  • Ants, spiders, bugs, beetles, larvae, and other invertebrates provide the pickerel frog with a well-balanced diet.

  • The pickerel frog population in localized areas is in decline due to intensive logging and habitat fragmentation.

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Beaver

Beaver

  • This little guy is the largest rodent in North America, and the second largest in the world. Not so little after all. Known for its powerful, long front teeth, beavers can make easy work of trees and other plants to build their dams.

  • 24–71 lbs Adult beavers usually weigh between 24–71 pounds.

  • Cottonwood, willow, alder, birch, maple and cherry trees are their preferred timber of choice. They also eat sedges, pondweed, and water lilies.

  • The beaver population was once 60 million, but because of the worth of their fur, the beaver was almost trapped out and extirpated from North America during European colonization. Today, their population is estimated to be between 10 and 15 million.

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Yellow-Spotted Salamander

Yellow-Spotted Salamander

  • The yellow-spotted salamander is a prime example of nature’s magnificence. If a leg, tail, and even parts of its head are dismembered, this salamander can grow them all back, although it does take quite a bit of energy.

  • 15–25 cm The spotted salamander is about 15–25 centimetres long.

  • A yellow-spotted salamander’s diet includes crickets, worms, insects, spiders, slugs, centipedes, and millipedes.

  • They spend most of their time in underground tunnels, where they also hibernate.

  • Introduction of certain fish species, wetland acidification and habitat fragmentation are some of the reason the yellow-spotted salamander population is declining.

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Plant Life

The forests, rivers, lakes, wetlands, and bogs of the Tremblant–Prévost region provide an ideal ecosystem for over 400 plant species.

Butternut

Butternut

  • 20 m Named after its fruit, the butternut is a deciduous tree growing up to 20 metres tall.

  • 75 yrs It’s a fast growing tree with a rather short life span, rarely living longer than 75 years.

  • Butternut flowers from April to June.

  • Butternut is close to extinction in Canada because of an introduced fungal disease.

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White Pine

White Pine

  • 40+ m Reaching heights of more than 30 metres, white pine earns the distinction of being the tallest tree in eastern North America.

  • 200-250 yrs Mature white pine can easily be 200 to 250 years old. Some of which live to be more than 400 years old.

  • Its seeds are an important food source for birds and small mammals.

  • Bald eagles and ospreys will take advantage of the height of these trees, using them as vantage points and nesting sites.

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Red Oak

Red Oak

  • 30 m Red oak can grow up to 30 metres tall.

  • 150 yrs The red oak can live for more than 150 years.

  • The acorns that grow on red oak are often eaten by deer, squirrels and various bird species.

  • Oak wilt, which is caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fagacearum, has led to the decline of red oak throughout North America.

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Great St. John's-Wort

Great St. John's-Wort

  • 1.5 m The Great St. John’s-Wort can grow up to 1.5 metres tall. Now that’s a big wort.

  • In the past, St. John’s-Wort was know as a herbal medicine for treating depression.

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Ostrich Fern

Ostrich Fern

  • 100-170 cm Ostrich fern grows 100 to 170 centimetres in height.

  • This species can form dense colonies that can withstand floodwaters.

  • One of the main threats to the ostrich fern is overharvesting for human consumption.

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Protected Area Monitoring Initiative

With the help of Toshiba and the Land Information System, the Nature Conservancy of Canada is able to identify threats, reverse dangers, and record crucial discoveries. The ‘Protected Area Monitoring Initiative’ is one of the many ways Tremblant–Prévost is being protected.

Threat

Threat

The Tremblant-Prévost region has the highest resident population growth rate in the province. The more residents in the area, the higher the demand for land use, including access to nature reserves. If access isn’t properly supervised, the Southern Laurentian Mountain region, and the species that live here will suffer the unfortunate consequences.

Action

The Nature Conservancy of Canada has partnered with other local organizations to allow citizens and visitors to enjoy the region’s protected sites while preserving their ecological integrity. The nature reserves welcome the public through educational activities, observation and interpretation of nature, hiking or snowshoeing and skiing, to the extent that these activities are carried out on designated trails.

Action

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Continue exploring some of Canada's protected properties